Sips of Glenora - the official blog of Glenora Wine Cellars

Gene Pierce
 
November 17, 2019 | Gene Pierce

The Glenora Gazette, Vol. 17, No. 11-19

The sky is clear over the vineyards of Glenora and the shores of Seneca. The temperature is 21 degrees; however, if you are outside, it feels like 13 degrees - a result of the wind which is coming from the south southeast at 5 miles per hour.

A snow covered vineyard after our first squall of the season.

More weather news: Looking at the forecast for the coming week and for the balance of November it appears we have seen that last of our 50 plus degree temperatures as the weather gurus are telling us to expect daily temperature highs to be in the 40 degree range with lows in the mid 20's and not a lot of precipitation. So the weather conditions appear to be fine for travel for next weekend's Seneca Lake Wine Trail's Deck the Halls event and the Cayuga Wine Trail's Holiday Shopping Spree Event. The forecast seems fine for Thanksgiving travel as well.

In the vineyard: The vineyard teams were VERY HAPPY that harvest had wrapped up the preceding week as this past week brought sleet, ice, snow and wind to the vineyards (and every place else). So in general, this past week was one of gathering up and putting away harvest equipment, harvest bins, and picking trays. The teams have started and will continue to "walk rows" checking for broken wires and posts that will be repaired before winter sets in. They also continue the hilling up project as well as applying potash to the vineyards that are in need of the same. We will also be reviewing the yields from a few of our older vineyards, and perhaps making the decision to retire some of them. Some of that is driven by yields (tons per acre) and some by the marketability and prices paid for the grapes which come from those vineyards.

On the Press Deck: The activity there has slowed significantly with the only activity this past week was the emptying of red fermenters: Cabernet Sauvignon that had been harvested the preceding week. Vice President of Production Tracey will not be wasting any time disassembling the press deck and wrapping up the equipment for winter storage.

In the cellar: With harvest/pressing finished for 2019, the Cellar team has returned to bottling and sparkling wine work on a full time basis. This also includes resuming some of our custom wine projects.

Our cellar team working on a tank of red wine, scraping skins.

Last Saturday's 43rd Annual Nouveau celebration was a success even in spite of the very cold weather (thanks Joel for keeping us warm). The wine, a Lemberger or Blaufrankish (a name that is on the same level as Limberger) was very well received and we heard, for the 42nd time, the comment "best ever". There was, "no best ever" comment for the first wine - for obvious reasons.

Last evening Chef John and his team at the Vineyard Restaurant at Knap presented their November Wine Dinner, "All that Jazz." Each of the five courses was themed around a very recognizable jazz tune, which was performed by a live artist (beats the alternative which we have thought was the case in some situations). Next month's dinner will wrap up the wine dinners for the season and hence is themed "All Wrapped Up" - December 7th.

It was another week or so of winery association meetings as during that 10 day period there were two wine trail meetings, a wine alliance meeting and a marketing/promotion organization meeting (there may have been a couple of chamber of commerce meetings held as well). If there is a common thread, it is that the same people seem to take leadership roles in many of these organizations and have done so for years. In many cases the organizations continue to do the same thing or to offer the same programs year after year after year. They, the organizations, often times wonder why they do not see an increase in support or membership - could it be there are no leadership opportunities/openings for people who are new in the industry, or the organizations offer programs never seem to change?

How much wine for Thanksgiving? Unless your guests or family do not enjoy wine, you might use this guide sent to us by long time Glenora supporter Diane Wolcott. Diane tells us roughly a bottle person - of course you would have several different types which would be shared. The only exception to that rule is that the chef who gets their own bottle of sparkling wine to enjoy will preparing the meat in addition to the wines served with the meal. (And then there should be a bottle or two for the dishwashing team!!)

This coming week the retail teams at Glenora, Knapp and CLR will be decorating for the wine trail holiday events. The trees will be up by Wednesday, the wreaths by Thursday, and wassail bowl out on Friday (we need a recipe). We will start mumming on Saturday evening - all are welcome!!!

Thought for the Week:  Education
"The aim of education is the knowledge not of facts but of values."
 

Time Posted: Nov 17, 2019 at 10:09 AM
Gene Pierce
 
November 3, 2019 | Gene Pierce

The Glenora Gazette, Vol. 3, No. 11-19

The sky is partly cloudy on this the first Sunday of the 11th month of 2019. The temperature is 36 degrees with a feel like reading of 30 degrees - a result of the wind which is coming from the west south west at 3 miles per hour.

Lake temperatures: The Seneca Lake recording buoy located at Clark's Point (Roy's Marina, or east of Vonnie's and Port's restaurant) has been removed for the season, hence no more Seneca Lake temperatures until 2020. Keuka, where the water temperature readings are taken at the municipal water plant in Penn Yan is recording 57 degrees. It has been interesting to follow the graphs that show the water temperature on Keuka. Ever since the middle of June the water temperature has been lower than it was at any given time in 2019 - a reflection of the weather pattern this year. It was cooler which also is an indicator for the lower Brix and higher acid levels in the grapes this year. Last year it was November 14th before Keuka reached 57 degrees.

In the vineyards: Another monsoon week, or at least the later part of it when we received 1.48 inches of rain on Thursday evening at all of the vineyard locations. That was followed by "hurricane type wind" (at least it seemed that way) on Thursday evening and most of Friday. The Knapp Team wrapped up their 2019 harvest by picking their Catawba on Wednesday afternoon. CLR harvested Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon and had plans to harvest the Mason Road Cabernet on Friday as well as Petit Verdot at CLR, but the rain and wind stopped that. The Mason Road Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard is on a bit of a slope, good for air drainage, but not good for harvesters, tractors and bin trailers after an inch and a half of rain. Those grapes will be harvested on Monday and that will finish the harvest season - November 4, 2019

A golden glow on the vineyard immediately to the north of Glenora Wine Cellars

The vineyard teams will be winterizing equipment this coming week as the forecast is for temperatures declining to the lower 20's on Thursday and Friday, with 2.7 inches of snow on Thursday. Sad news for any grapes still not harvested (and there seem to be quite a few) unless they are planned to be used for ice wine.

In the cellar and on the press deck: This past week, the press deck team emptied the red fermenters that contained Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Lemberger. The grapes had been in the fermenters close to a week (color extraction) before being pressed. This coming week, the Cabernet Sauvignon from Mason Road will be put into the tanks. Given the predicted cold temperature we are very glad our red fermenters are jacketed and can be warmed.

Associate winemaker Rachel preparing an oak barrel for our nouveau wine.

On Thursday, Kerry, Mitchell, Rachel, and the editor met to review plans for Deck the Halls number one. This will be the first Deck the Halls event for Mitchell and Rachel. The wine trail has sold tickets that will bring 3100 people to the trail. Historically we see 87% of them which would be approximately 2700 guests. We will be serving a holiday gourmet soup to each visitor - a half of a cup or 4 ounces. When multiplied by 2700 potential visitors that equals 10,800 ounces of soup or 84.375 gallons of soup. We will make 90 gallons as woe would be us at the next wine trail meeting if we were short of soup by few ounces - a public wine trail flogging! We also discussed staffing - 22 team members will be needed on Saturday which is the busiest day.

It was yet another double header wedding weekend at Glenora with weddings and receptions taking place on both Friday and Saturday. Today, Sunday, we have a group of 55 people who will be joining us for lunch and then a tasting. As part of the tasting, the editor will be giving them a brief history grape growing and wine production in the Finger Lakes viticultural area and at Glenora.

a wooden basket press loaded with lemberger; pressing wine for our nouveau celebration.

Finally the power of social media, websites, etc.. Several of the folks (many were millennials) who attended last Saturday's "Flannel and Foliage Dinner" at Knapp's Vineyard Restaurant had found the information by viewing the Cayuga Wine Trail website and then the Knapp Wine site. Almost all of the attendees were from outside the area-Philadelphia, Boston, etc. and had been looking for something to do while visiting Finger Lakes Wine Country - we have several new friends!

According the weather gurus the dress code for next weekend's Nouveau event at Glenora may include Carharts! But not to fear, as Maintenance Engineer Joel and his team have plans to bring in portable heaters-the ones that meet all of the building code (in this case tent) specifications.

Thought for the Week:  Laughter
"The most wasted of all days is one without laughter."
 
 

Time Posted: Nov 3, 2019 at 9:42 AM
Gene Pierce
 
October 27, 2019 | Gene Pierce

The Glenora Gazette, Vol. 27, No. 10-19

It is a damp morning on this the last Sunday in October in the vineyards of Glenora and along the shores of Seneca. The temperature is 54 degrees but feels like 48 degrees due the wind which is coming from the south southeast at 17 miles per hour. The wind and the wet weather are starting to end the colors of Fall. Lake temperatures: Seneca - 56.6 degrees; Keuka - 58 degrees. Last fall must have been warmer or quieter (less rain and wind) as it was November 9th in 2018 before Keuka reached 58 degrees.

In the vineyards: It was another damp/wet week, but no monsoons! Tuesday was the "wet day" with Knapp receiving .54 inches, while CLR and Glenora received .36 inches - we did not harvest on Tuesday! The Knapp team harvested Cabernet Franc, Lemember, and Vidal (about 5 tons of the Vidal where hand-picked for "iced wine"). The CLR team finished their Riesling along with Merlot and Syrah, and the Glenora press deck team saw Cabernet Franc, Merlot, and Lemberger arrive.

If all goes well, and it should, we will finish harvest with the Catawba being harvested at Knapp and Varick, and the Petite Verdot and Cabernet Sauvignon being harvested at CLR. As well, we plan to remove the Vidal that are in the freezer at Lakewood and press them for "Iced Wine". So it does appear that the 2019 harvest will run into November.

On Wednesday we (Tracey D. Kerry, Peter, input from Tracey M. and the editor) conferenced with our distributor, Empire North, to review year to date numbers, tweak plans for November and December, and to discuss, briefly, plans for the first quarter of 2020. We learned that, to date, the tariffs that have been imposed on imports to the United States have not had much of an impact on wine - more impact on spirits. It was also interesting to see the impact that "The Milennials" are having on/in the marketplace, especially pertaining items such as packaging (bottle size, labels), brand loyalty, and canned products. Along the canned line: Regional Sales Manager Anne sent a message noting the coffee is now being canned, and with a kick - read about here. Perhaps, as Anne suggests, we should introduce a wine based coffee!

It has been another double header wedding/reception weekend at Glenora. Our hats are off the restaurant, kitchen, and Inn teams. Back to back weddings during fall foliage season add even more intensity to the weekends (which they handle very well). And, they are doing this with a very lean staff. Thanks to everyone, you are appreciated!!

Last evening the Team at Knapp Winery Inn and Restaurant presented a themed dinner, Flannel and Foliage. Guests, most of whom had some flannel clothing, arrived to have cocktails (wine based of course) and wine on the Vineyard Restaurant's patio, then enjoyed at seasonal dinner, followed by the opportunity to go back outside to make smores. Enjoyable, unique and fun!! One has to wonder what is next?!!

The Great Debate: At Friday's Glenora managers meeting, there was discussion revolving around how Henry the XLIIIrd (that is 43rd for the non-Romans) would be prepared. Traditionally Henry "The Hogg" has been roasted, or in some cases burnt or destroyed (too much brandy??) over an open fire on a spit or on a smoker. The discussion-debate revolved around "should he be smoked, or roasted in an oven?" It seems that the group was leaning towards the oven - breaking a 42 year tradition. Time and weather will most likely dictate the venue for Henry. All of this will take place during our 43rd annual Nouveau wine celebration which will be held on Saturday November 9th - all are welcome

The editor was reminded last week that in addition to tickets still being available for the Cayuga Wine Trail's Holiday shopping Spree event and that there are still tickets available for the Keuka Lake Wine Trail's Keuka Holidays event. Lots of wine trail holiday opportunities!!

Finally tomorrow, Monday, is world Champagne Day - celebrate with a glass of Glenora's finest!
           https://www.winebusiness.com/news/?dataid=80319&go=getArticle

Thought for the Week:  Hope
            "He that lives upon hope will die fasting." Ben Franklin
 

Time Posted: Oct 27, 2019 at 9:31 AM
Heather Eriole
 
August 11, 2016 | Heather Eriole

So You Want to Plan a Wine Tour...

Written by Stacy Gray, Tasting Room Manager

Your BFF is getting married! Your sister is turning the big 3-0! What better way to enjoy a day out in the beautiful Finger Lakes than to charter a limo or bus, gather up all your besties, and check out these amazing wineries you’ve heard so much about!

Ok… so… where do you start?

What IS a wine tour, anyway? A wine tour is an excellent opportunity to sample some wines in order to choose your favorites to bring home with you – in a beautiful setting with friendly staff to help you along the way! It’s best to aim for 3-5 wineries in a day, with a planned stop for lunch along the way.

The first thing you’ll want to do is choose a lake to visit. There are many great wineries surrounded by beautiful scenery throughout the Finger Lakes, so you may want to pick the lake closest to home, or one with a wide variety of wineries. Or maybe, like many of our guests, you have a favorite must-visit winery and plan your tour around that area.

Ok, great! Next, it’s a good idea to do a little research about the wineries you’d like to visit. Check out their websites for group tasting policies, amenities, and events. You may discover a winery has live music, a unique restaurant, or any other number of things going on. One thing to check for is “Wine Trail Events” – this is something you may want to participate in, or, you may want to avoid the crowds! At Glenora you can reserve a special Chocolate & Wine Experience, or a cellar tour to see how the wine is made. You can also plan to have lunch at our restaurant, Veraisons, or even stay overnight with us at our Inn!

Next, you will want to pick a date – aiming for at least a month out is a good idea. An insider tip – Saturdays are the busiest day by far along the trail, so if you’d like a little more personal attention without fighting the crowds, picking a Sunday or weekday is a very smart idea! Here at Glenora, through the end of August, our reward members get double points on Wednesdays and Fridays… just sayin’! Not familiar with our Rewards Program? Learn more here.

Once you’ve decided on a lake and a date, you can start calling your chosen wineries to make reservations. The folks at the wineries are eager to help arrange your visit and are happy to answer your questions. Keep a notepad, a pen, and a credit card for deposits handy when you call. Most wineries have a cut off time in the afternoon for larger groups, so try to reserve your first tasting right when the first winery opens – usually 10am. Glenora’s tasting room opens at 9am during the summer months, so make a point to see us first!

Of course, you’ll want to hire transportation or designate a driver for your adventure. There are many options for limos, buses, and even a company that will drive you around in your own vehicle. It’s well worth the peace of mind to know you have a safe, sober, experienced driver at the wheel. The transportation companies and drivers are knowledgeable and can make suggestions for must-visit wineries, restaurants, and best routes to take.

A few other tips for a successful wine tour:

When traveling with multiple friends, it can be hard after a while to remember who bought what wine bottles once they start accumulating in the trunk. A great idea I have seen, is folks bring along different colored stickers (for example, garage sale price stickers), and each person has their own color to put on the top of the bottles they buy. Super easy and super smart!

Something you might want to bring along is water and snacks, or even a packed lunch, if you don’t plan to stop at a local restaurant. Our tasting room cheese cooler is always stocked with local cheeses, charcuterie and crackers if you need a pick me up during the day and we have many picnic tables around our property, perfect for taking in the view of Seneca Lake while snacking on some local wares. Many wineries offer the same throughout the wine trail.

Another bit of friendly advice, wineries need to abide by the law, which means they are prohibited from serving folks who are intoxicated. Making sure your group is aware of this is always a good choice!

We hope you’ll include Glenora on your next wine tour! We offer a wide variety of wines to please any palate, friendly staff, an incredible restaurant and inn, and the most stunning views of Seneca Lake! But wherever you end up, I hope this post has been helpful and informative, and that you all have a great time here in Finger Lakes Wine Country!

Time Posted: Aug 11, 2016 at 10:22 AM
Heather Eriole
 
May 9, 2016 | Heather Eriole

Spring Sipper: Riesling Rose Sangria

To celebrate the long-waited arrival of Spring, we wanted to share a delicious and fun sipper, perfect for the sunny days ahead. This recipe comes from our talented team at Veraisons and marries two Finger Lakes wine favorites into one tasty concoction : Riesling and Dry Rosé. The infusion of lemon thyme adds a unique touch to this refreshing and light drink. Make a batch and enjoy with brunch or sip some on a sunny Spring afternoon!

Glenora Wine Cellars Riesling Rosé Sangria
1 bottle Glenora Riesling
½ c sugar
2 cups strawberries, hulled and sliced
1 orange, sliced into thin rounds
1 pineapple, sliced into thin rounds
1 bottle Glenora Dry Rosé
4 sprigs lemon thyme
¼ c pineapple vodka
2 cup sparkling water

  1. Make the Riesling simple syrup. Combine the Riesling and sugar in a pot on the stove and bring to a boil.  Reduce to simmer and allow simmer to continue until liquid has reduced to 1 cup.  Remove from stovetop, stir in sprigs of thyme, and allow to cool to room temperature.
  2. Add sliced fruit to a pitcher. Pour Riesling simple syrup over the fruit, discarding the thyme sprigs.  Pour in vodka, Dry Rosé, and stir.
  3. Chill for one hour. Alternatively, chill vodka, wine, fruit, and syrup before combining.
  4. Just before serving, add sparkling water or club soda. Serve in large wine glasses with fruit!
Time Posted: May 9, 2016 at 9:30 AM
Heather Eriole
 
April 15, 2016 | Heather Eriole

Why Vegan? A Chef's Tale

Written by Sous Chef Sarah Hassler of Veraisons Restaurant

Veraisons is not a vegan restaurant, but we have become a vegan-friendly (very friendly!) restaurant.  When people learn of my passion for creating delicious meals free of animal product, they assume I must be vegan myself.  My answer typically surprises people; while I am allergic to gluten and dairy, I am not, in fact, vegan.

A classically trained chef, I was taught the techniques of the French – none of which were animal-friendly by the way.  There were no classes on vegan cooking; there were barely dishes to be served to the few who would attend.  I was vegetarian upon entering the CIA – two months of eating polenta and mushrooms and I conceded.

 

As my school days have long since passed, I have discovered that I enjoy a challenge and a direction when creating dishes.  The world of food is far too vast to create and streamline a meal without some frame to work within.  Anything can play the role of the framework, preferences, theme, restrictions – veganism is just one more box to work within.  That is why I chose to study food and become a chef – the knowledge is far beyond what one man could hold, and the chance to transform ingredients to suit is ceaseless.  Chefs are truly students for life.

Orlando and I have a lot in common when it comes to the kitchen.  We lead with our hearts, cook with our stomachs, and source food with our brains.  When a guest walks into our dining room, we want them to have an amazing meal and a pleasurable experience.  This goes for every guest, regardless of dietary restriction.

 

The dinner table is the place where humans come together.  We all need to eat – it’s that basic.  Regardless of color, creed, gender, or even (GASP!) political allegiances, seated at a table we are all equally human, fulfilling that common need.  Why should it be any different for people with dietary restrictions?

Some of my chef-friends argue that the folks with “legitimate” reasons for having restrictions are “ok”, but those who choose to eat a certain way and expect restaurants to work around them are asking too much.  To this I would reply – When did it become the right of the chef to take the choice away from the diner?

Perhaps this is a sign that we’ve taken our profession a few too many steps away from the blue-collar days.  When we stop being grateful for the people walking through our doors and paying us to do something they could do themselves – and then post later on Pinterest! – we might want to check ourselves.  The food isn’t about us – it’s about them.

 

The line that vegan food is somehow more “chemical” or made “in a lab” is also antiquated.  Our world is filled with factory-farms and our shelves stocked with highly-processed foods, no longer recognizable from their original state, so this seems a bit high-brow to say.  The reality is that all food is chemical…and it all equates to chemical energy.  See?  That student-for-life line wasn’t a lie!

Bottom Line:

My passion for creating vegan dishes comes from the same heart that creates dishes for omnivores.  I remain endlessly grateful for the opportunity to pursue my passion as a career, to feed people delicious food, and to be consistently challenged to become a better cook…for humans.

Time Posted: Apr 15, 2016 at 11:32 AM
Orlando Rodriguez
 
March 15, 2016 | Orlando Rodriguez

Buen Provecho: The Man Behind the Menu

As we gear up for Buen Provecho (simple Spanish translation: “Bon Appetit”), our first wine pairing dinner of the Spring season this Saturday, we’re shining a light on Chef Orlando’s menu inspirations, as well as what led him to become a chef, which means going back to his roots to where his love of cooking began…in his grandmother’s kitchen.

Throughout his childhood, Orlando could usually be found in her kitchen during family gatherings. He would watch large family meals come to life, take in the delicious aromas and join in the familial kitchen banter that many of us know and love.

Baby Orlando, eagerly awaiting what's next to eat.

A Connecticut native with Dominican heritage, Orlando is constantly inspired by his upbringing and culture, both of which play an integral role in his cooking, and of course, bring back many fun memories…like fighting with his aunt over who gets the pig tail.

Read on for more…

What sparked your interest in cooking?
My interest in the kitchen started as a young child.  I was told that I would go into the kitchen cabinets and take out pots and pans to play with. All the family would get together on the weekends and make a massive family meal and everyone would help out.  I would always hang out in the kitchen and watch my grandmother and my aunts prepare food.  I was always impressed by the fact that they would dice onions and peppers in the palm of their hands (not a safe method by the way) never cutting themselves.  I loved the smell of the peppers, onions, and garlic on the stove cooking that would linger in the air as they cooked, even still to this day.  There wasn’t much I didn’t eat; I remember having arguments with one of my aunts about who was going to eat the pig tail. At the end, we would always end up sharing when there would be a pig roast.
I started to cook at home at the age of 8, not sure if I was just being scammed into making sandwiches, grilled cheese, and omelets, but my sisters always said I made the best food.  They still swear that it was the truth to this day.  Honestly, I think they just still want me to cook for them.

Orlando and his grandparents at a restaurant in the Dominican Republic.

Did your grandmother use ingredients or any special methods that you use in your cooking today?
My grandmother and my family members still use a mortar and pestle, which is used to grind up spices and herbs.  I also use a wooden one at my home. 

Do you have a favorite dish or recipe of your grandmother’s?
I had the honor of helping out my grandmother marinate a pig a few years ago for Christmas.  I say it was an honor because my mother and aunts told me later that no one was ever allowed to help marinate a pig with Grandma Carmen so I should feel privileged, which I was.  Yes, the mortar and pestle was used that day, and no, I will not let you in on her secrets.

One of my favorite dishes is Mondongo.  It is stewed tripe soup.  Whenever family comes to visit my grandmother goes out of her way to make some and send it to me.

A fogon, an outdoor stove, was used in a small hut to keep the heat out of his grandmother's kitchen. It is pictured here.

Can you tell us about the traditional Dominican treat Morir Soñando?
It is a traditional drink made with orange juice,  milk, sugar, and vanilla.  The translation of the word is died and gone to heaven. 

What dish are you most excited about on the menu for this weekend?
Well, it would have to be Mondongo, of course.

Time Posted: Mar 15, 2016 at 10:38 AM
Gene Pierce
 
October 7, 2015 | Gene Pierce

A Fresh Coat

In late August, we began a project to repaint the winery to match the colors of the Inn and Veraisons; quite the exciting time for us as it would be the second time the winery received a fresh coat since our opening in 1977.

Earlier in the summer, we learned from our maintenance team that repainting the building was on the agenda before fall’s arrival, and after a few color scheme discussions, the idea to match the Inn was born and we took off running. We could envision the beautiful, cohesive look it would create and as the painting began, we could see it becoming a reality. There isn’t a better feeling than that!

As the paint job neared completion, a new and improved awning was next on the list, replacing the original which went up in the mid-90’s. We documented the process all along and have compiled some before and after images for your enjoyment! If you haven’t seen our new look in person, we hope you can visit us soon!

Glenora Wine Cellars with its old taupe paint job.

Progress- the building is half painted its new warm brown to match the inn.

A van from Spotts Awning and Tent parked in the Glenora lot.

The building has been stripped of the old sign in preparation to raise a new one.The fresh forest green Glenora sign is being hoisted into place on the facade of the freshly painted building.The Winery & Inn at Glenora - now matching with brown and forest green facades.

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